Irish doctors targeted by other jurisdictions

Irish GPs are being targeted by other countries – who despite having bigger GP to patient ratios than Ireland – need even more highly-trained GPs to expand their primary care services.

General Practitioners in Ireland are also being targeted by countries such as Canada, the United Kingdom and Qatar to emigrate to those countries because of the international impression that general practice is in crisis in this country. Continue reading »

Irish doctors head to Qatar

The World Cup may or may not end up in Qatar, but if it is, there will be a lot of Irish doctors on-hand to treat casualties

Doubling the number of trainee GPs will not solve the growing problem of a shortage of GPs in the country, according to the chair of the Irish Medical Organisation’s GP committee, but instead would be like ‘increasing the water pressure in a leaky pipe’.

Dr Ray Walley – who has a GP practice on Dublin’s northside said that having met the newly-appointed Minister for Health, Leo Varadkar, he had confidence that the Minister understood the problems facing general practice, but that increasing the number of GP trainees would not solve the looming shortage.

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GP’s unable to make a living in rural Ireland

There has been a Dr Casey working as a GP in Clifden since 1916. When the current Dr Casey’s father, Dr Michael Casey took over in the 1940s, he replaced another Dr Casey (no relation) and when he retired in 1974, his son, Dr John Casey took over.

But it’s unlikely that a Dr Casey will have been the local doctor in Clifden for a hundred years in 2016, despite the fact that Dr Casey’s son, (also John) has qualified as a GP and works in the practice with him.

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First, do no harm

There are at least three phrases the Irish people don’t want to hear again after eating the humble pie of an economic collapse.

Those post-prandial flourishes – “We are where we are”, “legacy issues” and “the actions of a previous government” seem like reasonable excuses, but not when the government seems hell-bent on creating the type of problems now that will come back to haunt us in the future.

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Health savings would fund more doctors

The health service does not need more money to improve the service radically and about €2bn should be reallocated to provide more doctors in the system, according to Dr Edward Walsh, the founding president of the University of Limerick. Dr Walsh was speaking at the National Association of General Practitioners‘ annual general meeting in Dublin.

He said Ireland had the highest hospital prices in the OECD, as well as its most inefficient health system, and that €1.7bn would need to be taken off the health budget to make it as efficient as the average OECD country. A further €2bn would need to be taken off to make Ireland as competitive as New Zealand. Continue reading »

Why it’s crucial the State heeds warnings of GPs

The National Association of General Practitioners says that the primary care system is close to collapse.

Terence Cosgrave talks to three doctors about the choices and challenges they face and why one doesn’t regret his decision to emigrate.

CUTBACKS in general practice have reached a breaking point, with many GPs operating at a loss or breaking even. It means that many will have to reduce their service to the public or even leave Ireland to earn a reasonable income. The result could be a devastating blow to general practice in Ireland – a service that is universally acknowledged by the public as the one area of the health service that works.

Dr David Janes, for example, is a GP in rural Waterford near the town of Clonmel. He says that last month he worked for nothing, as by the time he had paid for all his overheads, there was no money left to pay himself a salary. With a wife and three children, that position is untenable.

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